PREREQUISITES

The Interdisciplinary MFA is designed for individuals from around the world who seek a challenging curriculum that spans disciplines. We seek students who ask tough questions, and show evidence of creative risk-taking.

Prerequisites include an undergraduate degree (BFA preferred) from an accredited institution, an ongoing creative practice, and a working understanding of contemporary art and culture. Creative practitioners come from a variety of backgrounds. The most important MFA prerequisite is an engaged, ongoing artistic practice.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SUMMER 1 (10 credits)

This seminar course provides advanced study of a interdisciplinary art practices. By investigating hybrid approaches to visual art, students will learn how artists employ methods from diverse disciplines. This seminar is a foundation for the MFA curriculum.
Using a hands-on workshop format, the course will employ experiential learning within the natural environment of the Global North to foster new levels of awareness and engagement.
A location consists of multiple geographies, narratives, histories, and cultures. Using varied frames of reference, students will approach a specific location as a site for creative work. This is the first course in a set of four required Art and Place courses. Post-industrial cities and towns are the subject of this unit.
The Techno Lab Series presents art methods, materials and techniques through craft and technology training. Each course is aligned with the craft and industry traditions of a specific residency location. There are four sections of the course, which can be taken in any order.
Through group critiques and one-on-one conversations the conceptual and practical framework for independent work will be strengthened. This course is the springboard for the creative work that students will do in their home location following the residency intensive.

FALL 1 ONLINE (2 credits)

Art History and the Global investigates the relationship between art and culture in various geographical, cultural and historical settings. The exploration of local and global themes concerning art production and culture will emerge through case studies, presentations and written research.

FALL 1 (8 credits)

Students work with a prominent mentor on a group project. In each course, a visiting practitioner or cultural group will lead the students through a collaborative or directed participation project. The course is taught four times throughout the student’s graduate work, in varying locations.
A location consists of multiple geographies, narratives, histories, and cultures. Using varied frames of reference, students will approach a specific location as a site for creative work. This is the second course in a set of four required Art and Place courses. Colonialism and Post-Colonialism is the subject of this unit.
The Techno Lab Series presents art methods, materials and techniques through craft and technology training. Each course is aligned with the craft and industry traditions of a specific residency location. There are four sections of the course, which can be taken in any order.
Through group critiques and one-on-one conversations the conceptual and practical framework for independent work will be strengthened. This course is springboard for the creative work that students will do in their home location following the residency intensive.

SPRING 1 (8 credits)

Students work with a prominent mentor on a group project. In each course, a visiting practitioner or cultural group will lead the students through a collaborative or directed participation project. The course is taught four times throughout the student’s graduate work, in varying locations.
A location may consist of multiple geographies, narratives, histories, and cultures. Using varied frames of reference, students will approach a specific location as a site for creative work. This is the third course in a set of four required Art and Place courses. Psycho-Geography and Walking is the subject of this unit.
The Techno Lab Series presents art methods, materials and techniques through craft and technology training. Each course is aligned with the craft and industry traditions of a specific residency location. There are four sections of the course, which can be taken in any order.
Through group critiques and one-on-one conversations the conceptual and practical framework for independent work will be strengthened. This course is springboard for the creative work that students will do in their home location following the residency intensive.

SUMMER 2 (8 credits)

The MFA Thesis Critique provides one-on-one conversations with visiting artists and the program thesis advisors and director, as the student develops their thesis in the second half of the program. The student’s goals and objectives will be honed as the thesis work evolves. The course is repeated three times as students develop the MFA Thesis.
The Techno Lab Series presents art methods, materials and techniques through craft and technology training. Each course is aligned with the craft and industry traditions of a specific residency location. There are four sections of the course, which can be taken in any order. Techno Lab 4 is dedicated to writing code.
Building upon an awareness of locational dynamics and collaborative processes, Public Art invites a public artist to work with students on a community artwork for the city of Hartford. The launch of a 12-month collaborative development and planning process is the content of this course. The finished artwork will be created during the following summer in Public Art 2.
What systems of art exchange, distribution and sharing are possible, and how do these economic strategies intersect with creative intentions? This course brings students to New York City for the final week of the summer session.

FALL 2 ONLINE (2 credits)

This course prepares students for a career as an interdisciplinary artist and public intellectual. Students will develop professional writing skills, including grant writing. Managing a budget, generating project proposals, and handling the business aspects of a creative career will be covered.

FALL 2 (6 credits)

Using a hands-on workshop format, the course will employ experiential learning within the natural environment of the Global South to foster new levels of awareness and engagement.
Students work with a prominent mentor on a group project. In each course, a visiting practitioner or cultural group will lead the students through a collaborative or directed participation project. The course is taught four times throughout the student’s graduate work, in varying locations.
The MFA Thesis Critique provides one-on-one conversations with visiting artists and the program thesis advisors and director, as the student develops their thesis in the second half of the program. The student’s goals and objectives will be honed as the thesis work evolves. The course is repeated three times as students develop the MFA Thesis.

SPRING 2 (8 credits)

The MFA Thesis Critique provides one-on-one conversations with visiting artists and the program thesis advisors and director, as the student develops their thesis in the second half of the program. The student’s goals and objectives will be honed as the thesis work evolves. The course is repeated three times as students develop the MFA Thesis.
Through investigating art therapy principles and social engagement towards healing, this course will explore ways art can lead to greater wellbeing in diverse settings.
Students work with a prominent mentor on a group project. In each course, a visiting practitioner or cultural group will lead the students through a collaborative or directed participation project. The course is taught four times throughout the student’s graduate work, in varying locations.
A location consists of multiple geographies, narratives, histories, and cultures. Using varied frames of reference, students will approach a specific location as a site for creative work. This is the last course in a set of four required Art and Place courses.

SUMMER 3 (10 credits)

Building upon the work in Public Art 1, Public Art 2 allows the continuation of work on a public artwork made in collaboration with a prominent artist. The content of this course is the completion of the Hartford public artwork.
The MFA Thesis Exhibition course allows for feedback from Thesis Advisors during the Thesis Exhibition development process. This course is a capstone class of the Interdisciplinary MFA program.
The MFA Thesis Exhibition course allows for feedback from Thesis Advisors during the Written Thesis development process. This course is a capstone class of the Interdisciplinary MFA program. An art history faculty member will oversee the writing of the MFA Thesis.